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  • Why Discipleship

    Why Discipleship

    "Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age."
    - Jesus' words in Matthew 28:19-20

  • Partnerships

    Partnerships

    "And my God will liberally supply your every need according to His riches in glory in Christ Jesus."
    - Phillipians 4:19

  • Why Discipleship

    Back

    Why Discipleship

    "Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age."
    - Jesus' words in Matthew 28:19-20

  • Partnerships

    Back

    Partnerships

    "And my God will liberally supply your every need according to His riches in glory in Christ Jesus."
    - Phillipians 4:19

  • Join the Mission

    Back

    Join the Mission

    With your help we are able to train leaders living near least-reached communities to multiply disciples.

What is an ambassador?

The dictionary definition of an ambassador is an accredited diplomat sent by one country as its official representative to a foreign country.

Ambassadors act as representatives or promoters of a specific activity.

Ambassadors are appointed by their governments to live in foreign countries while maintaining their citizenship in their homelands. Their role is to reflect the official position of the sovereign body that gave them authority.

The question is how does this relate to being a disciple of Jesus?

Ambassadors for Christ

In the letter to the Corinthians, Paul discusses the ministry of reconciliation and uses the term ambassadors for those with whom God has brought reconciliation through Jesus Christ and to whom He has given the ministry of reconciliation (2 Corinthians 5:18-20); those who have been reconciled must then become ambassadors of reconciliation. Ambassadors do not represent themselves. They are always on duty to officially represent the country of which they are a citizen. As ambassadors for our King Jesus Christ, we represent Him in this world. In fact, the only impression many people ever get of Christ is what they see in us; we are the fifth Gospel that our world can read! The main point is that broken people who have been healed are then commissioned to go to other broken people and point the way towards reconciliation. I am a living testimony of that!

Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners—of whom I am the worst. But for that very reason I was shown mercy so that in me, the worst of sinners, Christ Jesus might display his immense patience as an example for those who would believe in him and receive eternal life.  (I Timothy 1:15)

As ambassadors for Jesus, we have been sent by Him to represent Him here on earth as He represents us before the Father in heaven (Ephesians 2:6; Colossians 3:1-4; 1 Peter 2:12). We have the great privilege of speaking on behalf of him, pleading with people to be reconciled to God through Him. God has entrusted as ambassadors to represent the ministry and the word of reconciliation. This is an incredible privilege granted to us to represent Him here on earth. Hallelujah!

In all we do and all we say, we should strive to be the very best reflection of our Lord who believed enough in us to give us the ministry of reconciliation. In Acts 11:26, the disciples were called Christians because they were reflecting Jesus Christ in all that they did. As long as we live in this world, we should walk with great humility, knowing that God has committed to our trust the Word of reconciliation. No matter where we go or who we see and talk to, we should walk with the dignity associated with one who is an ambassador for Jesus Christ.

We are no more ordinary people. We have been given the ministry of sharing the Gospel of reconciliation with a dying world. We have been given everything we need to proclaim and plead the need to be reconciled to God with any and all we meet (Romans 10:14-15). There is only one way to restore the relationship of peace with God and that is through repenting, accepting the finished, redemptive work of Jesus Christ, believing that God raised Him from the dead, and confessing Him as Lord. Once this is done in the heart, then reconciliation is complete, and an eternal relationship of peace and life is accomplished.

As ambassadors of the heavenly King, we are not allowed to stay shut up in the four walls of the church building, forgetting our mission of reconciling all people with God. Our job is not to stay in the embassy but to go out into the world and take the message of our King to reconcile others with God. There are more than 2 billion people who have not yet heard of the Good News of Jesus. If every ambassador will do their part in sharing about the Prince of Peace, praying for the unreached, and in supporting those who have limited resources, everyone might get an opportunity to hear the Good News and choose to follow Jesus Christ.

The basic mission for all of us as disciples of Jesus is to carry out the mandate given by Him—to be reconciled ourselves as a practical way of witnessing His redemptive work of love for the salvation of humanity. We must remember that reconciliation is God’s initiative to which we respond through His amazing grace of love.

God wants us to represent Him in this world, to respond to the spiritual, relational, emotional, and physical needs of our world. We share the Gospel with people to help them with their most serious needs in life. Everyone needs to hear that God loves them (John 3:16, John 10:10) and that their lives have meaning and purpose (Jeremiah 29:11; John 14). However, because of their sin, they are not able to experience all that God has planned for them (Romans 3:23; Romans 6:23). The Good News is that they have hope if they are willing to repent of their sin to turn to God. Our loving God is looking and waiting for them, and we need to share this Good News with them and lead them to join the heavenly Kingdom by making Jesus their Savior and Lord.

It is deeply satisfying to help someone come to know and worship their true God. Sharing the Gospel gives us a tremendous sense of significance because we are taking part in the work of eternal worth, sharing in the work of God Himself. God has created us in Jesus Christ to do the work He has designed for us (Ephesians 2:10). That is what it means to be ambassadors of Christ in the world in which we live.  May the Lord use us as His official ambassadors to our generation as we share the message of reconciliation through Jesus Christ with the dying world!

Are we representing Christ well as His official ambassadors in our neighborhoods and work places?

What do I need to change to represent Him well?

CONCLUSION

We are social beings created to have right relationships both with our Father and with our brothers and sisters around the world. It is a good reminder for us not to forget that our mark as Christ-like disciples is love for one another beyond our localities and denominations. Forgiveness is the other side of the coin of love.

Relationships are restored through forgiveness, and inner healing is completely related with forgiveness too. It is great to allow the Lord to search our hearts and cleanse us from our guilt (Psalm 139:23-24).

When we pray for inner healing, we are really asking God to walk back into the dark places of our lives and bring healing to the distressing and painful memories of the past. Our ambassadorship for the King Jesus will make a difference when we relate with one another and with the societies in which we live.

Global Disciples Canada is a Christian mission organization that trains local leaders living near least-reached communities to multiply disciples for Christ. One third of our world hasn’t heard the Good News of Jesus. Yet. Global Disciples refers to these as “least-reached” people, and fewer than 10% of all missionaries work among these groups. We live in a time where many of these people are within reach of a local church. Through our simple and effective strategy of training and coaching, believers share the Gospel in their own nations and cultures. Jesus said, “Go and make disciples of all nations,” and we’re committed to doing just that. If you are looking for a Christian mission organization to partner with to become a better disciple and help make disciples, connect with us today!

We are social beings created for relationships at home with our families and neighbors, at work with our employees/employers, and in the community of disciples.

In Christ-like relationships, husbands and wives must submit to one another in reverence to Christ.

Husbands should submit themselves to love, lead, protect, sacrifice, and provide for the needs of their family, and wives should submit to and support their husbands and families (Ephesians 5:21-33).

Children should submit to respecting and honoring their parents, and parents should submit to raising their children by instructing them according to the word of God (Ephesians 6:1-4).

In the work place, employees should submit to their employers by fulfilling their responsibilities, and employers should also submit to their employees by seeking the best for them (Galatians 3:28).

The difficult call to relationship

We are relational beings, but the sin that destroyed our relationship with God also ruined our relationship with others. This is why life’s greatest hurts as well as life’s greatest joys come through relationships with people. So, how can we overcome some of the challenges we face in our relationships so as to follow the example Jesus has left for us? We are disciples of Jesus, called to obey His teaching and to follow him no matter what.

Agree with each other, love each other, be deep-spirited friends. Don’t push your way to the front; don’t sweet-talk your way to the top. Put yourself aside, and help others get ahead. Don’t be obsessed with getting your own advantage. Forget yourselves long enough to lend a helping hand. Think of yourselves the way Christ Jesus thought of himself. He had equal status with God but didn’t think so much of himself that he had to cling to the advantages of that status no matter what, not at all. When the time came, he set aside the privileges of deity and took on the status of a slave, becoming human! Having become human, he stayed human. It was an incredibly humbling process. He didn’t claim special privileges. Instead, he lived a selfless, obedient life and then died a selfless, obedient death … (Philippians 2:1-11).

Jesus is God by nature, but He made himself empty and came to this world as a human to serve and live among us to show us the way of a joyful life. He lived by fully submitting himself to what His Father wanted Him to do (John 5:19, John 5:30). He came to serve, not to lord over people. Throughout His earthly ministry, Jesus showed us what the Father looks like (John 14:9)—not just what He was like 2,000 years ago but what He looks like all of the time. He taught His disciples to serve as He served them instead of lording over them (Matthew 20:26-28).

Christ-like Relationships are our Witness

As followers of Christ, submitting to one another requires that we hold more tightly to unity and love than to our rights and privileges.  Jesus said that the most important commandment is to love God, and the second most important is to “Love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:31). If we are going to have Christ-like relationships with others, we need to love people—even people who are hard to love. Jesus set the example for us, coming to die even for the people who hated Him. Love is a willingness to set aside our own concerns so as to attend to the needs of others. Love is more than a feeling that includes actions (1 John 3:16-17; 1 Corinthians 13). Christ-like relationships within the community of believers allow us to love one another deeply, walk-in fellowship with one another, bear each other’s burdens, encourage and build each other to grow, and serve our world together (Hebrews 10:24-25).

When we love one another as Jesus loves us, the world knows that we are the disciples of Jesus (John 13:33-34).  The early Church was known for their love and care for one another as it is recorded in Acts 4:32-34:

All the believers were one in heart and mind. No one claimed that any of their possessions was their own, but they shared everything they had. With great power the apostles continued to testify to the resurrection of the Lord Jesus.  And God’s grace was so powerfully at work in them all that there were no needy persons among them.

The meaning of life is not in having authority over others but in serving them. Paul in his epistles wrote that we should “serve one another in love”—this is a Christ-like relationship (Galatians 5:13; Galatians 6:2; Philippians 2:3). Serving others gives us a meaningful life (1 John 4:10-11). When we kneel down and serve somebody, it makes it harder to think that we are important or mighty. This is why leaders in the Church should be servants (John 13:15); that is the only way that eternal life is going to be enjoyable for everyone. We thank God for leaders who follow the example of Jesus and risk their lives to serve others. True greatness lies not in power but in service—the type of service that Jesus demonstrated.

Christ-like Relationships in the Church  

One of the arenas where we can serve one another is within the community of believers, the Church. As we all know, there is no perfect church, just like there is no perfect person. But the Church is the community of disciples that is designed to help us on our journey to grow together in knowing Jesus. In this community, we learn how to walk with Jesus, remember His sufficient grace and promises, and grow together in experiencing God to serve our society.

This community also helps us to stay focused on our life purpose, and it gives us opportunities to exercise patience and forgiveness which we may not like but which still helps us learn to be more like Jesus. Paul reminds us of the example we ought to follow (Colossians 3:13; Ephesians 4:32).

God has purposefully given us different gifts to serve one another (1 Corinthians 12:11). We need each other just as each part of our body needs the other parts. We have not been given gifts to serve ourselves or to boast about our gifts but to serve others (1 Corinthians 12:14-26). God has given us different gifts “for the common good of others” (1 Corinthians 12:7). We need each other to grow in the image of the Son—the eternal purpose of God—and to reach our world for His glory (Romans 8:29).

When we follow in the footsteps of our master, Jesus, His mercy and grace fill our families, our neighbors, our faith communities, and our workplaces. In all our relationships, we should help one another to grow in Christ-like character, to encourage, and to build each other up (Galatians 5:22-23; Romans 12:10; Ephesians 4:2; 1 Thessalonians 5:11, 1 Thessalonians 5:15; Ephesians 5:22-25; Ephesians 6:1-8).

Christ-like Relationships Take Time

Living a life that reflects Christ-like relationships won’t be easy and it won’t happen overnight. It takes time, so we need patience with the process, both with ourselves and others. We need faith that God will finish the work He has started in us. God is “a God of mercy and grace, endlessly patient—so much love, so deeply true—loyal in love for a thousand generations, forgiving iniquity, rebellion, and sin” (Exodus 34:6-7). It is my prayer and desire that His character overflows in our relationships with others.

How is your relationship with your family (spouses, children, and parents) and with your neighbors?

How are your relationships at your workplace?

How are your relationships in the church family?

Are all of your relationships reflecting the way Jesus related with people?

What does it mean to have the same mindset as Christ Jesus in our relationships with one another (Philippians 2:5)?

Global Disciples Canada is a Christian mission organization that trains local leaders living near least-reached communities to multiply disciples for Christ. One third of our world hasn’t heard the Good News of Jesus. Yet. Global Disciples refers to these as “least-reached” people, and fewer than 10% of all missionaries work among these groups. We live in a time where many of these people are within reach of a local church. Through our simple and effective strategy of training and coaching, believers share the Gospel in their own nations and cultures. Jesus said, “Go and make disciples of all nations,” and we’re committed to doing just that. If you are looking for a Christian mission organization to partner with to become a better disciple and help make disciples, connect with us today!

Jesus clearly taught us to forgive all who have offended us, whether intentionally or unintentionally.

This forgiveness needs to be unconditional and unending just as is our heavenly Father’s forgiveness. This is required of us because, as disciples, we have already experienced forgiveness for everything we have done, without exception (Matthew 6:14-15, Matthew 18:22).

Not only did Jesus teach us to forgive, but He extended forgiveness while He was still in pain on the cross. When He was being nailed on the Cross, He pleaded with the Father to forgive those who were crucifying him—those whose hearts refused to receive the Gospel that He preached, those who refused to let God’s Kingdom reign in their hearts. This includes the entire human race for we all were found to be guilty with hardened hearts. 

Even in the midst of the worst pain and suffering that He endured under the hands of wicked people, Jesus chose to pray for them so that God would forgive them. He showed His kindness, mercy, and love for them and for us. 

If Jesus forgave all those who crucified Him, extended His forgiveness to all of us, and commanded us to be channels of His forgiveness, what right do we have not to forgive those who hurt us?   

In Matthew 18:21-35, Peter asked Jesus how many times to extend forgiveness to someone who hurts us. He asked, “Up to seven times?” Jesus responded with a parable of two slaves who both owed money. The first owed a large amount of debt to the king, and the second owed a much smaller debt to the first slave. When the first slave begged for mercy, the king forgave the entire debt, leaving the slave owing nothing. However, when the second slave begged for mercy, the first slave did not forgive the debt but had the slave thrown into prison. When this became known to the king, the first slave was rebuked, sent to prison, and tortured. In this passage, Jesus expressed the seriousness of forgiveness— those who do not forgive others will suffer for it. This suffering refers to all of the side effects—relational, physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual—that come from holding on to bitterness and anger instead of forgiveness (Matthew 5:23-24).  That is why Jesus commanded us to make forgiveness a part of our daily life so that we would not experience these effects.

Forgiveness of self

Forgiveness is being obedient to Jesus’ instruction to “love your enemies.” In many cases, enemy number one is one’s self.

Self-forgiveness is essential to self-healing, and each time we forgive someone, our own sense of self-forgiveness and self-worth will grow; it is the true way to improve our own self-image.

Creative imagination makes all things possible in a forgiving state of mind. To the degree that we are healed, that same healing is made available to all those in our lives who have bound us in any way or that we have held in bondage—our parents, spouses, children, friends, everyone that our lives touch.[1]

Forgiveness of others

The choice to forgive frees us and allows God to mend and restore our broken hearts.

Joseph was imprisoned for many years because of the false accusation of Potiphar’s wife (Genesis 39). Now, imagine yourself in his shoes: falsely accused of sexual abuse, losing the reputation you had, losing your job, losing your position, being put in prison. Putting ourselves in Joseph’s shoes, we can imagine how it feels to have our friends, relatives, and all who know us gossiping because of something which is not true. It is painful, and stealing someone’s good name is a very serious sin before God (Exodus 20:16). Yet when we look from God’s perspective, God can restore our reputation as He did with Joseph. Keep in mind that whenever our reputation is stolen, God is the One who will bring the truth to light. We need to remember that God is the one who has the right to revenge, not us (Romans 12:19).  Don’t fight for your reputation—leave that to God!

When time is taken away from us, due to unfair processes—just as they were for Joseph and for many Christians who were tortured and imprisoned for their faith—the only key to healing the wound left behind is forgiveness. Joseph is an impressive example of how he extended his forgiveness to his brothers who sold him to Egypt (Genesis 45:4-5; Genesis 50:15-21). No one can erase what happened in the past, but the future can be different because God has the power to heal a broken heart through what Jesus has done on the cross. 

Holding onto pain and hurt, refusing to forgive those who wounded us, will block the healing power of the Holy Spirit in our inner being. Bitterness is a deadly poison that inhibits us from receiving God’s forgiveness and gives us over to torment. The only solution is to release those feelings that we have against others so that the Holy Spirit’s forgiving power can restore our souls.

It is very important to open ourselves and allow the Lord to heal our inner wounds as is described in Luke 4:18: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me … He has sent me to heal the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives and … to set at liberty those who are oppressed.”

It is very important to respond to Jesus’ calling to receive the inner healing that He has provided to us (Matthew 11:28-29). Let us release our heavy burden to Jesus, take His yoke which is easy, and learn from Him who has forgiven us and welcomed us to be children of God (Ephesians 4:32).

Is there any broken relationship that you are aware of that needs to be restored?

How quick are you to forgive yourself and others without holding a grudge?

How often do you reflect the forgiveness of God in your relationship with your parents, spouse, children, church family, and neighbors?


[1] Ruth Carter Stapleton, The Gift of Inner Healing, 1976.

Global Disciples Canada is a Christian mission organization that trains local leaders living near least-reached communities to multiply disciples for Christ. One third of our world hasn’t heard the Good News of Jesus. Yet. Global Disciples refers to these as “least-reached” people, and fewer than 10% of all missionaries work among these groups. We live in a time where many of these people are within reach of a local church. Through our simple and effective strategy of training and coaching, believers share the Gospel in their own nations and cultures. Jesus said, “Go and make disciples of all nations,” and we’re committed to doing just that. If you are looking for a Christian mission organization to partner with to become a better disciple and help make disciples, connect with us today!

God created us for relationship with Him. Adam and Eve enjoyed that close relationship with God until sin entered the world. The sin that entered the world through our first parents destroyed our intimacy with God and others (Genesis 3:1-8). However, God didn’t give up; He took the initiative to make our relationship right with Him while we were weak, sinners, and enemies (Romans 5:6-10). He is concerned about our relationship with Him more than anything else. He doesn’t care how far we have gone, what a mess we have made, how bad we look, how good we are, or what we have accomplished. Rather, God cares about the relationship that He prepared for us through Jesus. He demonstrated His own love for us by sending His only begotten Son to die for us (John 3:16-18).

Jesus died for us to show God’s greatest love for us and to restore our relationship with Him (John 15:13). In Jesus, God has shown us how much He loves us, even while we are still sinners. In Christ, we are assured of His constant love that will never fail—this is the solid foundation for our relationship with God. He already has finished His part to make our relationship right; now it our responsibility to accept what He has already done to restore our relationship with Him. He sent His only Son Jesus to take away our sin (John 1:29), and He offers us the promise, “Everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved” (Acts 2:21). Therefore, to make our relationship right with God, we need to live out the following steps.

4 Steps to Make our Relationship right with God
1. Admit that we are sinners

The first step to restoring our relationship with God is to admit that the life we are living and the direction we are going is wrong. We must accept responsibility because of our bad choices as did the prodigal son (Luke 15:11-17); we need to acknowledge our sin that separates us from God (Romans 3:23) and its penalty of death (Romans 6:23). But for many of us, it is very difficult to come to this conclusion of admitting our sins, and we tend to hide or blame others for our sin as did Adam and Eve. While our lives are falling apart all around us and we are figuratively reduced to feeding pigs like the prodigal son, we still try to convince ourselves that life is good. It is my prayer that God brings us to our senses as He did the prodigal son. “When he came to his senses, he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired servants have food to spare, and here I am starving to death!” (Luke 15:17). Admitting our mistake is the first step to restoring our relationship with God—but it is not the end.

2. Return to God in repentance

The second step in making our relationship right with God is returning to God with a repentant, humble attitude rather than hiding and covering (Acts 3:19; Genesis 3:10-13; Luke 15:18-20; Isaiah 59:2). Returning to God through confession removes the sin that blocks our relationship with Him. When we confess our sins before God, He promises to forgive us (1 John 1:9), and forgiveness is what restores a relationship that has been broken. Some people admit their sinfulness but never do anything about it. Some people even say, “I need to get my life right with God,” but they never actually return to God. The prodigal son did not only plan to get right with his father, he actually took steps to do so; he made a decision and returned with a repentant, humble heart. Some people simply want God to bless them, but they are not willing to make their relationship right with Him by leaving where they are and returning to God. 

The prodigal son did not minimize his behavior as if it were no big deal. He said, “I have sinned against heaven and against you.” He took full, personal responsibility for his bad choices and actions. He neither blamed anyone else nor did he ignore his own sinfulness. He humbly acknowledged, “I am not worthy to be called your son” (Luke 15:19). In other words, he was acknowledging that he did not deserve anything from his father. This is something we all need to recognize in returning to God to restore our relationship with Him—God owes us nothing and is not obligated to bless us in any way. We don’t come to God making excuses or demands but rather by acknowledging our personal wrongdoing and asking for His mercy. Our God is a loving Father who is waiting for us to be serious about restoring our relationship with Him.

3. Recognize that God will lovingly welcome us home

Most of the time, the people who have messed up are not willing to come back home to God because they are unsure they will be welcomed back. No matter how far we have gone, our loving Father welcomes us home. There are seven things that the father does in the story of the prodigal son—looking, running, kissing, giving clothing and ring and sandals, and throwing a feast (Luke 15:20-24). These acts convey the depth of his love and illustrate the heavenly Father’s love for anyone who totally messes up but is willing to return.  God welcomes us home when we come back to Him with humble and repentant hearts. 

The story of the prodigal son’s father gives us a clear picture of our heavenly Father who is always looking for and hoping that His wayward children will come back home. He is a compassionate and loving Father who runs toward us to give us a hug and kiss and welcome us home as soon as we make the decision to return to Him. He shows His love and acceptance to us by giving us the best robe (righteousness), ring (authority of the children of God), shoe (the Gospel of peace), and feast to celebrate the restoration of our relationship with Him.

4. Receive the free gift of God and live as His beloved children

Making our relationship right with God begins with our spiritual birth (John 3:3-8). As soon as we receive His free gift of becoming sons and daughters, we confess that Jesus Christ is our Savior and Lord (Romans 10:9-10). Our restored relationship with God is the beginning of our ongoing transformation into Christ-likeness (2 Corinthians 5:17-18; Galatians 4:6). We are no more slaves but are His children who serve in our Father’s business (Luke 15:28-32). Let’s live like beloved children and experience our authority as His children (Ephesians 5:1). 

The relationship that God offers us is so intimate that He calls us His children (1 John 3:1; John 15:15) and promises to give us an eternal inheritance (Romans 8:15-17). He invites us before His throne as often as we want (Ephesians 2:18), and He loves us with a love that will never fail. He loves us and accepts the responsibility of providing our needs, protecting us, and helping us to grow toward maturity. Jesus is not ashamed to call us brothers (Hebrews 2:11). We praise God for this kind of relationship He has initiated for every person created in His own image and likeness.  Our relationship with God is built upon a life of obedience (Ephesians 5:1). James tells us that as we submit ourselves to God through obedience, resist the devil, and draw near to God, He will draw near to us (James 4:7-8).

Jesus set an example for our relationship with God. We can look to Jesus to learn more about our relationship with God the Father (John 17). For some people, like me, “Father” brings only negative memories. But when God reveals Himself as a Father, He does not want to cause fear, but love. He wants to remind us of His protection, of His provision for all of our needs, and of His care (Luke 15:20-24). Human parents ought to have these qualities, but everyone falls short of the ideal while some are even evil. But God the Father is perfect—we are secure in His love (Matthew 5:48; Luke 6:36; John 6:32; 2 Corinthians 1:3; James 1:17). We should imagine the best father possible and be assured that God is 100 times better than even this ideal image.

Jesus was sure that the Father loved him (John 3:35; John 5:20). He was also sure that God, as a perfect Father, would provide for His needs. He trusted His Father to take care of him, even after death. He told His disciples not to worry about their lives, or their food and clothing (Matthew 6:28-34). Our God is the loving and caring Father who provides all of our needs even better than He does for the birds and the flowers.  We need to know that our Father loves us, cares for us, and is always forgiving.  It is our responsibility to become the channels of His love, care, and forgiveness.

Have you made your relationship right with God?

Global Disciples Canada is a Christian mission organization that trains local leaders living near least-reached communities to multiply disciples for Christ. One third of our world hasn’t heard the Good News of Jesus. Yet. Global Disciples refers to these as “least-reached” people, and fewer than 10% of all missionaries work among these groups. We live in a time where many of these people are within reach of a local church. Through our simple and effective strategy of training and coaching, believers share the Gospel in their own nations and cultures. Jesus said, “Go and make disciples of all nations,” and we’re committed to doing just that. If you are looking for a Christian mission organization to partner with to become a better disciple and help make disciples, connect with us today!